A glimpse of life at the Wynnstay Arms, Ruabon 1944

This collection of pictures from the Imperial War Museum demonstrates what everyday life at the Wynnstay Arms, Ruabon was like in 1944.

Three men discuss various local issues over a pint of beer and a cigarette at the Wynnstay Arms in Ruabon.

Local labourer Price Evans drinks down his pint of beer at the Wynnstay Arms in Ruabon. According to the original caption, Mr Evans said “It may be dear, it may be thin, but there ain’t no bad beer”.

A view of empty bottle holders behind the bar at the Wynnstay Arms, Ruabon. This lack of spirits, such as whisky and gin was a common sight in wartime. Also visible is a price list for beers. The original caption states that the “scrawled out, altered price list shows budget increases in drink prices”. A poster invites locals to donate their ‘rural pennies’ to the Red Cross Agriculture Fund.

Corn Merchant Harold Davenport (right) and Rev. Harold J Crowasdale (left) enjoy a pint and a chat in the snug of the Wynnstay Arms, Ruabon. According to the original caption, Rev Crowasdale is originally from Lancashire and was vicar of All Saint’s Church in Ruabon for seven years.

A group of women enjoy a drink and share a joke at the Wynnstay Arms, Ruabon. The original caption reads: “Along the stone flagged passage, wives gather in ‘Ladies Corner’, gossip and drink Guinness at one and a penny a bottle”.

Source:

WARTIME PUB: EVERYDAY LIFE AT THE WYNNSTAY ARMS, RUABON, DENBIGHSHIRE, WALES, UK, 1944
part of “MINISTRY OF INFORMATION SECOND WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION” (photographs) Made by: Ministry of Information Photo Division Photographer

The media for this item are free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. Video, sound and images can be embedded with the code we offer here, and images can also be downloaded. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © IWM (D 18494)