Wynn Hall Colliery, Penycae

Wynn Hall Colliery, Penycae

Wynn Hall Colliery, Penycae.

The Wynn Hall colliery was opened by William Kendrick, the grandson of John Kendrick.

Wynn Hall Colliery, long since dismantled had two pits, the Foundry Pit and the Rock Pit. At this colliery all the principal coals from Dirty or Seven Foot to the Wall and Bench seams have been worked at one time or another, the Quaker, Main, Ruabon, Yard and Wall and Bench being the best seams. In 1846 water spread from the Bee Pit (Plas Madoc Colliery) and “Drowned out” the Foundry Pit.

Apparently some portion of Wynn Hall Colliery were working in 1854 for in that year H. M. Inspector’s list of Mines included Wynn Hall Colliery and the owner was William Kendrick of Wynn Hall. William Kendrick (born 1798, died 1865) was the son of the third John Kendrick of Wynn Hall and father of the late Mr. Llewelyn Kendrick, Solicitor and H. M. Coroner for Denbighshire. Wynn Hall Colliery was working in1868. The Foundry Pit was re-opened in 1876 to work the higher seams which remained above water according to the Geological Survey of 1928.

A wages ticket of 28th February 1868 shows that three miners in the employ of John Wright at Wynn Hall Colliery earned between them £17.11.5d for a month. Out of this amount, they had to pay for Powder, Candles, Fuse, Doctor, Fund and Allowances. This came to £17.14.7d. After working for a month, they were 3s.2d in debt.

(From the Wynn Hall Journal Vol. 2 from 1841)

Royalty of coal from Wynn Hall Colliery divided between seven of the Kendrick family 1842 – £204. 1853 – £186. 1844 – £280. 1847 – £167. 1853-4 – £210. 1855-6 – £347. 1856/7 – £265. 1859/9 – £330. 1859/60 – £191.

The royalty from the Old Colliery for the whole year of 1861 – £123 14s. 4d.

In Worral’s Directory of North Wales 1874 it shows Wynn Hall Old Colliery owners as Bertram & Son.

Wynn Hall Colliery, Penycae


Wynn Hall Colliery, Penycae


Source: Wynn Hall Journal Vol. 2 from 1841; Worrall’s Directory.


 



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