1800s

An account of Wrexham in 1833

WREXHAM, a market-town and parish and head of a union, chiefly in the hundred of BROMFIELD, county of DENBIGH, but partly in the hundred of MAELOR, county of FLINT, NORTH WALES, 24 miles (S. E. [more]

As it was!

Beyond the Beast Market

The streets off the Beast Market were home to a cluttered mix of housing, trade and industry. Behind Charles Street were the corporation’s original slaughterhouses, later replaced by new premises off Holt Road and the [more]

As it was!

New Wrexham Fairs

The northern side of Beast Market Street was still farmland when Norden made his survey in 1620. The town developed this way in the 17th and 18th centuries. The thatched building, with the dormer windows, [more]

As it was!

Wrexham Fire Brigade est. 1852

Fire was a major risk in all towns. The parish church was seriously damaged by fire in 1463 and Wrexham’s ‘great fire’ caused more damage in 1643. The first fire brigades were established in the [more]

As it was!

Cobden Mill Enamelled Matchbox

The illustration on this enamelled match box is of Cobden Mill on Watery Road adjacent to the railway line in Wrexham. The mill was built after the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846 and [more]

1800s

Overton Arcade in the 19th Century

William Overton was born in Wrexham in 1813, he was the son of William Overton and Elizabeth Parry (widow of John Parry, maltster). His father was a grocer in Charles Street and also a church [more]

As it was!

The YORKE Fountain

The River Gwenfro, was the “town brook”  it ran  through the bottom part of the town, at one time it was a clean and pleasant stretch of water – but over the years with all [more]