A History of the Bomb site

Compiled from the notes and slides of the late Glynn Jones

The area once known as the bomb site has quite a history, it was bounded by Queen Street, Henblas Street, Chester Street & Lambpit Street. This is not just about the old Market, a lot of other buildings have disappeared over several years, Grammer School, The Old Guidhall, A Chapel, Old Library, Fire station, two pubs, several shops, two gent’s toilets and three cinemas have closed too. 

4. Street Atlas 1872 shows Queen Square, Potato Market, Congregational Chapel, Birmingham Hall, Grammar School, Wrexham’s 1st Fire Station, Toilet and Union Hall. 

6. Aerial View 1950 – Closer view showing some points of interest including Veg Market, Butter Market, Guildhall and fire station etc. 

History of the Bomb Site

7. Municipal Buildings 1900 – Guildhall and Old Free Library, this was the original Wrexham Grammar School, it was acquired by the Borough Council in 1884 as the Guildhall. To the right is the free library and court rooms. 

History of the Bomb Site

8. Guildhall Square 1910 – entrance from Chester Street. The grammar school was founded in 1603 and closed in 1880. The building to the right was the School of Science and Art founded in 1893. The small gate led to the congregational chapel. 

History of the Bomb Site

9. Guildhall 1960 – the council used it until the 1960’s, the building to the right is Wrexham’s 2nd Library. 

History of the Bomb Site

10. Guildhall Square 1910 – Accession of King George V, with the mayor on the balcony, RWF Military Guard. With Queen Victoria’s monument, Congregational Chapel on the left whilst on the right is the Music Hall which later became the offices of the Wrexham Advertiser. 

History of the Bomb Site

11. Guildhall 1911 – Decorated for the coronation of King George V on 22nd June 1911. 

History of the Bomb Site

12. Guildhall Square 1935 – Prince of Wales and the mayor Mr Hampson inspect the Guides and Scouts. 

History of the Bomb Site

14. Queen Victoria Statue – Guildhall Square. The sculptor was Henry Price, a student at the nearby school of science and art. It was later moved to create extra parking spaces for buses along with a Thursday wholesale Fruit and Vegetable market. 

History of the Bomb Site

15. Queen Victoria’s statue is now located at Belle Vue park. 

History of the Bomb Site

17. Alongside Guildhall Square stood the congregational chapel, which cost £2611 to build, it opened in 1841 and was demolished in 1960, this photo shows the unveiling of Queen Victoria’s statue on 1st May 1903. It was moved to Belle Vue park in 1929. 

History of the Bomb Site

18. On the other side of Guildhall Square stood the fire station, seen here with Mason a steam powered engine “Victoria”. Dated 1895. 

History of the Bomb Site

19. The fire station 1908. 

History of the Bomb Site

20. Outside the Guildhall c1920. 

History of the Bomb Site
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